IMMAF – WMMAA President Comments on New MMA Federations with Sights on Olympics

“IMMAF – WMMAA has received some enquiries about a new organisation, GAMMA, and ONE FC’s recent statement of support for the group and its goal of seeing MMA into the Olympics. In light of these questions and IMMAF – WMMAA’s long journey to obtain sport recognition, I feel it is appropriate to respond publicly.

“We are of course aware of the Global Association of Mixed Martial Arts (GAMMA), which formed only recently at the end of 2018. We are equally aware of a couple of other start-up groups of disputable credibility that have popped up lately on social media, purporting to represent the sport of MMA and appearing to co-opt our vision and goals.

“Of course, anyone is free to form a group and call itself a governing body. But it is then for those the group claims to represent to be certain that it is legitimate. It is important to validate the group’s fitness to obtain its stated purpose and ensure that it adheres to international standards of good governance.

“Those who have followed or travelled with us on our journey over the past six years will know that it takes many years to build a federation that fulfils all its duties. It takes at least three years of organisational compliance to meet the criteria required by GAISF (the Global Association of International Federations), and this criteria is clearly published for all to see in the statutes on GAISF’s own website. It is well known that an organisation has to first be recognised by GAISF (and indeed the World Anti-doping Agency) before it can be considered for inclusion in the Olympic programme.

“As CEO Densign White has well detailed to our membership, GAISF requirements include a democratically elected board, audited accounts, evidence of General Assemblies, a WADA compliant anti-doping programme, a qualifying number of nationally recognised members and a track record of sport development. Even for IMMAF – WMMAA, which meets these requirements, Olympic inclusion is but a future vision. For an organisation without these elements in place, hope of sport or Olympic recognition is but a pipe dream.

“I am honestly bemused by the appearance of these pop-up groups: During our application process for “Observer Status” recognition, GAISF informed us that the greatest obstacle to MMA being accepted was rivalry from within the sport. This was due to competing claims from two world MMA governing bodies, IMMAF and WMMAA. In 2018, our two organisations dutifully merged, bringing together the best, and we have continued to work hard to unify the sport. Having addressed this rivalry objection, we were surprised by GAISF’s subsequent rejection of our application. We have been in communication with GAISF since and are in the process of reapplying.

“Against this background, the emergence of new, pop-up MMA federations does not serve the interests of the sport nor its bid for recognition. It can only serve to create unnecessary divisions and the perception of rivalry, which those who oppose our sport may try to use to obstruct us. It does not bring MMA any closer to recognition, which is much needed for safeguarding the sport’s participants. And it certainly does not make MMA’s Olympic dream any more tangible.”

IMMAF President Kerrith Brown

Pictured: IMMAF – WMMAA Presidents Kerrith Brown and Vadim Finkelchtein

Dominant Amateur MMA World Champion Muhammad Mokaev Discusses the Value of International Experience

As an undefeated prodigy of the UK’s amateur MMA scene; Muhammad Mokaev has now stormed beyond the comforts of home turf to prove himself at the international level.

Mokaev was just 12-years-old when he and his family moved to Manchester, England, all the way from Dagestan in Russia, a famous and sizzling hotbed of mixed martial arts and wrestling talent.

Interestingly, it was in England where Mokaev took up wrestling, the foundation of his MMA skill set, with the City of Manchester Wrestling Club, shortly after arriving in the country. Today, the 18-year-old is a veteran competitor for the GB wrestling team, with ambitions of competing in the Olympic Games.

By his 18th birthday, Mokaev was already among the most recognizable faces in UK MMA, and no doubt one of its most polarizing and confident characters. At 7-0 he opted against the ever tempting professional transition, instead recognising the high volume of remaining experience and opportunity for growth on offer as a young amateur.

Mokaev picks up the pace as he enters for the 2018 World Championships final.

Thus, in 2018 he became a multi-sport Olympic hopeful upon joining MMA’s drive for inclusion under the Olympic banner, via IMMAF-WMMAA, the unified global governing body through which Mokaev represented his adoptive nation at the record breaking Amateur MMA World Championships, featuring over 350 athletes representing 50-plus nations.

Flying the flag for Team England, Mokaev competed in the concurrent Junior World Championships (for athletes age 18-20), in the men’s bantamweight division. Three victories in as many days saw him best opposition from Russia, Kazakhstan and Mexico before cruising to a unanimous decision win over Japan’s Asian Open champion, Reo Yamaguchi, in the gold medal decider.

Speaking to IMMAF.org, Mokaev reflected on the differences and any surprising aspects of competing at the international level.

Actually, I believe that some juniors were stronger than in the senior divisions,” he stated, having grown accustomed to facing older opponents. “The level under IMMAF-WMMAA is higher than I expected, the arena is huge, the cage I believe is the same size as UFC, the medical and cutman team were on point and well organised. Also, the fights started on time and with same day weigh-ins, no delays.”

In the process of capturing the junior world title, Mokaev expanded his record to 11-0 and diversified his experience through the single elimination tournament, in a format unique to MMA, facing off on a day’s notice against diverse opposition from across Europe, Asia and Latin America, each posing their own contrasting style.

Mokaev believes he became a greater competitor having tested himself beyond the limits of the UK.

“I believe those competing internationally are on a different level than those who always compete locally, because when you’re competing abroad and against other countries, then you’re growing and your confidence builds up from each fight.

“If an amateur fighter is planning to fight professional, I think IMMAF-WMMAA is the best platform, as you’re even getting used to travelling to other countries, eating different food, weather conditions, the hotel. These things can effect the your performance, so if you do this in the amateur stage then this will be easier in a professional career.”

While the talent pool of the UK is high as one of the world’s MMA hot spots, Mokaev agrees that it is possible to develop a false sense of security, and that further challenges can be found at the international amateur level, such as Russia’s renowned wrestling prowess that cannot be experienced so easily among UK rivals.

For amateurs, the platform is there to offer growth. The idea of facing difficulty or even defeat against an obscure rival and learning from contrasting national styles is something to be embraced, rather than facing such lessons for the first time as a pro.

I think it’s ok to just fight in the UK,” Mokaev commented, “but if you’re planning to go to UFC, Bellator or ACA, then you have to fight internationally. There are opponents from other countries who are stronger. For example, in the UK there is good BJJ, but Russia has better wrestling than UK. Get better tested and you will grow as a fighter, 100%.”

Ready for all comers, Mokaev faces down Kazakh opposition in the World Championships quarter-finals.

He added, “If you face Russians at the IMMAF-WMMAA’s, then when you fight them, for example on ACA, then you will know how to prepare. I believe that the amateur level is very important, as soon as you turn professional you have to be a rounded fighter, be ready to fight any wrestler, boxer, Thai-boxer or BJJ guy. There’s no shame if you lose in amateurs, you have to go out there and fight so when you turn to pro you’re ready for everything. To go out internationally is important because when you sign with promotions like UFC or Bellator, there won’t be just British guys.”

2018 Junior World Championships: men’s bantamweight medalists.

Currently training at the world famous Tiger Muay Thai gym in Phuket, Mokaev prepares for his next international amateur outing under the IMMAF-WMMAA banner. The reigning junior world champion steps up to battle among the senior ranks (age 18+) as he targets the 2019 Asian Open Championships, taking place from 1-4 May in Bangkok, Thailand.

By IMMAF.org lead writer/photographer: Jorden Curran

Athletes & Teams Confirmed for IMMAF – WMMAA Asian Open

Eleven nations have registered to compete in the first unified IMMAF – WMMAA Asian Open Championships of Amateur MMA, which takes place in Bangkok from 1 to 4 May 2019. 

Of these, seven participating nations are from Asia, including Bahrain, China, India, Kazakhstan, Lebanon, Malaysia and Thailand.  Four further nations from outside the continent will also be represented in France, United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand.

Hosted by the Thai Mixed Martial Arts Federation (TMMAF), the three-day tournament takes place at Bangkok’s Ambassador Hotel. The Tournament Draw is scheduled for the 1 May with competition days running from the 2 to 4 May. All matches take place under Unified Amateur MMA Rules.

See below for the full list of registered competitors by nation and by weight division.

NATIONAL TEAMS

AUSTRALIA
Cody Barnwell – Men’s Welterweight 77.1 kg (170 lbs)
Corey Reeves – Men’s Welterweight 77.1 kg (170 lbs)

BAHRAIN
Isa Aldoy – Men’s Strawweight 52.2 kg (115 lbs)
Ebrahim Darwish – Men’s Strawweight 52.2 kg (115 lbs)
Mohammed Almuamari – Men’s Flyweight 56.7 kg (125 lbs)
Mansur Magomedov – Men’s Flyweight 56.7 kg (125 lbs)
Magomed Idrisov – Men’s Bantamweight 61.2 kg (135 lbs)
Ali Yaqoob – Men’s Bantamweight 61.2 kg (135 lbs)
Abdulmanap Magomedov – Men’s Featherweight 65.8 kg (145 lbs)
Yousif Sayyar – Men’s Lightweight 70.3 kg (155 lbs)
Shamil Gimbatov – Men’s Lightweight 70.3 kg (155 lbs)
Murad Guseinov – Men’s Welterweight 77.1 kg (170 lbs)
Abbas Khan – Men’s Welterweight 77.1 kg (170 lbs)
Abdulrahman Alhasan – Men’s Middleweight 83.9 kg (185 lbs)
Ramazan Gitinov – Men’s Middleweight 83.9 kg (185 lbs)
Mohammed Haji – Men’s Light Heavyweight 93 kg (205 lbs)
Shamil Gaziev – Men’s Heavyweight 120.2 kg (265 lbs)
Pasha Kharkhachaev – Men’s Super Heavyweight 120.2 kg (265 lbs) +

CHINA
Huihua Ni – Women’s Flyweight 56.7 Kg (125 Lbs)
Tianhao Feng – Men’s Flyweight 56.7 Kg (125 Lbs)
Guangmei Han – Women’s Bantamweight 61.2 Kg (135 Lbs)
Fuyao Li – Men’s Featherweight 65.8 Kg (145 Lbs)
Yunfeng Li – Men’s Featherweight 65.8 Kg (145 Lbs)
Xxx Tanghesi – Men’s Welterweight 77.1 Kg (170 Lbs)

FRANCE
Sola Axel – Men’s Middleweight 83.9 kg (185 lbs)

INDIA
Balakrishna Patange – Men’s Middleweight 83.9 kg (185 lbs)
Vaibhav Shetty – Men’s Middleweight 83.9 kg (185 lbs)

KAZAKHSTAN
Ayan Tursyn – Women’s Atomweight 47.6 kg (105 lbs)
Ukilay Akhmetualikyzy – Women’s Atomweight 47.6 kg (105 lbs)
Yerulan Kabdulov – Men’s Strawweight 52.2 kg (115 lbs)
Bagdat Zhubanysh – Men’s Strawweight 52.2 kg (115 lbs)
Shynar Zhussipova – Women’s Strawweight 52.2 kg (115 lbs)
Nurzhamal Sadykova – Women’s Strawweight 52.2 kg (115 lbs)
Tolkyn Daurenbekova – Women’s Flyweight 56.7 kg (125 lbs)
Darkhan Umirbekov – Men’s Flyweight 56.7 kg (125 lbs)
Adilkhan Ayazbayev – Men’s Flyweight 56.7 kg (125 lbs)
Olzhas Moldagaliyev – Men’s Bantamweight 61.2 kg (135 lbs)
Sora Rakhmonova – Women’s Bantamweight 61.2 kg (135 lbs)
Dastan Amangeldy – Men’s Bantamweight 61.2 kg (135 lbs)
Elaman Shalkimbekov – Men’s Featherweight 65.8 kg (145 lbs)
Antonina Kotlyarevskaya – Women’s Featherweight 65.8 kg (145 lbs)
Anatoliy Zolotykh – Men’s Featherweight 65.8 kg (145 lbs)
Mazhit Sardarov – Men’s Lightweight 70.3 kg (155 lbs)
Neimat Assadov – Men’s Lightweight 70.3 kg (155 lbs)
Talshyn Zhumatayeva – Women’s Lightweight 70.3 kg (155 lbs)
Zhan Kenzhebayev – Men’s Welterweight 77.1 kg (170 lbs)
Aidyn Tolepbayev – Men’s Welterweight 77.1 kg (170 lbs)
Aleksandr Val – Men’s Middleweight 83.9 kg (185 lbs)
Madi Dosmukhametov – Men’s Middleweight 83.9 kg (185 lbs)
Serik Abirov – Men’s Light Heavyweight 93 kg (205 lbs)
Zelemkhan Khumaidov – Men’s Light Heavyweight 93 kg (205 lbs)
Eldar Kudarov – Men’s Heavyweight 120.2 kg (265 lbs)
Alexandr Dya – Men’s Heavyweight 120.2 kg (265 lbs)
Rassul Khatayev – Men’s Super Heavyweight 120.2 kg (265 lbs) +

LEBANON
Onnik Simon Misissian – Men’s Flyweight 56.7 kg (125 lbs)
Joe Aouad – Men’s Lightweight 70.3 kg (155 lbs)
Bachir Ricardo – Men’s Light Heavyweight 93 kg (205 lbs)

MALAYSIA
Amirah Makhtar – Women’s Atomweight 47.6 kg (105 lbs)
Colleen Augustin – Women’s Strawweight 52.2 kg (115 lbs)
Gloria Isabelle Hoong – Women’s Strawweight 52.2 Kg (115 Lbs)
Brandon Tang – Men’s Strawweight 52.2 kg (115 lbs)
Tsan Nieng Khai – Men’s Heavyweight 120.2 kg (265 lbs)

NEW ZEALAND
Talor Wetere – Men’s Welterweight 77.1 kg (170 lbs)

THAILAND
Gayroong Chomchon – Women’s Atomweight 47.6 kg (105 lbs)
Jirayus Chulak – Men’s Flyweight 56.7 kg (125 lbs)
Sirirot Sinchaitan – Men’s Bantamweight 61.2 Kg (135 Lbs)
Viroj Wanram – Men’s Bantamweight 61.2 Kg (135 Lbs)
Narupon Plodpai – Men’s Bantamweight 61.2 Kg (135 Lbs)
Phasit Supharojdilok – Men’s Bantamweight 61.2 Kg (135 Lbs)
Sarun Rosruen – Men’s Featherweight 65.8 Kg (145 Lbs)
Pokpong Malapetch – Men’s Featherweight 65.8 Kg (145 Lbs)
Prach Buapa – Men’s Featherweight 65.8 Kg (145 Lbs)
Alex Blin – Men’s Lightweight 70.3 Kg (155 Lbs)
Chayut Rojanakat – Men’s Lightweight 70.3 Kg (155 Lbs)
Nitchanan Tubsai – Women’s Lightweight 70.3 Kg (155 Lbs)
Thatchai Tariya – Men’s Light Heavyweight 93 Kg (205 Lbs)

UNITED KINGDOM
Muhammad Mokaev – Men’s Flyweight 56.7 kg (125 lbs)

WEIGHT DIVISIONS

WOMEN’S ATOMWEIGHT 47.6 KG (105 LBS)
Amirah Makhtar – Malaysia
Ayan Tursyn – Kazakhstan
Gayroong Chomchon – Thailand
Ukilay Akhmetualikyzy – Kazakhstan

MEN’S STRAWWEIGHT 52.2 KG (115 LBS)
Bagdat Zhubanysh – Kazakhstan
Brandon Tang – Malaysia
Ebrahim Darwish – Bahrain
Isa Aldoy – Bahrain
Yerulan Kabdulov – Kazakhstan

WOMEN’S STRAWWEIGHT 52.2 KG (115 LBS)
Colleen Augustin – Malaysia
Gloria Isabelle Hoong – Malaysia
Nurzhamal Sadykova – Kazakhstan
Shynar Zhussipova – Kazakhstan

MEN’S FLYWEIGHT 56.7 KG (125 LBS)
Adilkhan Ayazbayev – Kazakhstan
Darkhan Umirbekov – Kazakhstan
Jirayus Chulak – Thailand
Mansur Magomedov – Bahrain
Mohammed Almuamari – Bahrain
Muhammad Mokaev – United Kingdom
Onnik Simon Misissian – Lebanon
Tianhao Feng – China

WOMEN’S FLYWEIGHT 56.7 KG (125 LBS)
Huihua Ni – China
Tolkyn Daurenbekova – Kazakhstan

MEN’S BANTAMWEIGHT 61.2 KG (135 LBS)
Ali Yaqoob – Bahrain
Dastan Amangeldy – Kazakhstan
Magomed Idrisov – Bahrain
Narupon Plodpai – Thailand
Olzhas Moldagaliyev – Kazakhstan
Sirirot Sinchaitan – Thailand
Viroj Wanram – Thailand
Phasit Supharojdilok – Thailand

WOMEN’S BANTAMWEIGHT 61.2 KG (135 LBS)
Guangmei Han – China
Sora Rakhmonova – Kazakhstan

MEN’S FEATHERWEIGHT 65.8 KG (145 LBS)
Abdulmanap Magomedov – Bahrain
Anatoliy Zolotykh – Kazakhstan
Elaman Shalkimbekov – Kazakhstan
Fuyao Li – China
Prach Buapa – Thailand
Pokpong Malapetch – Thailand
Sarun Rosruen – Thailand
Yunfeng Li – China

WOMEN’S FEATHERWEIGHT 65.8 KG (145 LBS)
Antonina Kotlyarevskaya – Kazakhstan

MEN’S LIGHTWEIGHT 70.3 KG (155 LBS)
Alex Blin – Thailand
Chayut Rojanakat – Thailand
Joe Aouad – Lebanon
Mazhit Sardarov – Kazakhstan
Neimat Assadov – Kazakhstan
Shamil Gimbatov – Bahrain
Yousif Sayyar – Bahrain

WOMEN’S LIGHTWEIGHT 70.3 KG (155 LBS)
Nitchanan Tubsai – Thailand
Talshyn Zhumatayeva – Kazakhstan

MEN’S WELTERWEIGHT 77.1 KG (170 LBS)
Abbas Khan – Bahrain
Aidyn Tolepbayev – Kazakhstan
Cody Barnwell – Australia
Corey Reeves – Australia
Murad Guseinov – Bahrain
Talor Wetere – New Zealand
Xxx Tanghesi – China
Zhan Kenzhebayev – Kazakhstan

MEN’S MIDDLEWEIGHT 83.9 KG (185 LBS)
Abdulrahman Alhasan – Bahrain
Aleksandr Val – Kazakhstan
Balakrishna Patange – India
Madi Dosmukhametov – Kazakhstan
Ramazan Gitinov – Bahrain
Sola Axel – France
Vaibhav Shetty – India

MEN’S LIGHT HEAVYWEIGHT 93 KG (205 LBS)
Bachir Ricardo – Lebanon
Mohammed Haji – Bahrain
Serik Abirov – Kazakhstan
Zelemkhan Khumaidov – Kazakhstan
Thatchai Tariya – Thailand

MEN’S HEAVYWEIGHT 120.2 KG (265 LBS)
Alexandr Dya – Kazakhstan
Eldar Kudarov – Kazakhstan
Shamil Gaziev – Bahrain
Tsan Nieng Khai – Malaysia

MEN’S SUPER HEAVYWEIGHT 120.2 KG (265 LBS) +
Rassul Khatayev – Kazakhstan
Pasha Kharkhachaev – Bahrain

The post Athletes & Teams Confirmed for IMMAF – WMMAA Asian Open appeared first on IMMAF.

Athletes & Teams Confirmed for IMMAF – WMMAA Asian Open

Eleven nations have registered to compete in the first unified IMMAF – WMMAA Asian Open Championships of Amateur MMA, which takes place in Bangkok from 1 to 4 May 2019. 

Of these, seven participating nations are from Asia, including Bahrain, China, India, Kazakhstan, Lebanon, Malaysia and Thailand.  Four further nations from outside the continent will also be represented in France, United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand.

Hosted by the Thai Mixed Martial Arts Federation (TMMAF), the three-day tournament takes place at Bangkok’s Ambassador Hotel. The Tournament Draw is scheduled for the 1 May with competition days running from the 2 to 4 May. All matches take place under Unified Amateur MMA Rules.

See below for the full list of registered competitors by nation and by weight division.

NATIONAL TEAMS

AUSTRALIA
Cody Barnwell – Men’s Welterweight 77.1 kg (170 lbs)
Corey Reeves – Men’s Welterweight 77.1 kg (170 lbs)

BAHRAIN
Isa Aldoy – Men’s Strawweight 52.2 kg (115 lbs)
Ebrahim Darwish – Men’s Strawweight 52.2 kg (115 lbs)
Mohammed Almuamari – Men’s Flyweight 56.7 kg (125 lbs)
Mansur Magomedov – Men’s Flyweight 56.7 kg (125 lbs)
Magomed Idrisov – Men’s Bantamweight 61.2 kg (135 lbs)
Ali Yaqoob – Men’s Bantamweight 61.2 kg (135 lbs)
Abdulmanap Magomedov – Men’s Featherweight 65.8 kg (145 lbs)
Yousif Sayyar – Men’s Lightweight 70.3 kg (155 lbs)
Shamil Gimbatov – Men’s Lightweight 70.3 kg (155 lbs)
Murad Guseinov – Men’s Welterweight 77.1 kg (170 lbs)
Abbas Khan – Men’s Welterweight 77.1 kg (170 lbs)
Abdulrahman Alhasan – Men’s Middleweight 83.9 kg (185 lbs)
Ramazan Gitinov – Men’s Middleweight 83.9 kg (185 lbs)
Mohammed Haji – Men’s Light Heavyweight 93 kg (205 lbs)
Shamil Gaziev – Men’s Heavyweight 120.2 kg (265 lbs)
Pasha Kharkhachaev – Men’s Super Heavyweight 120.2 kg (265 lbs) +

CHINA
Huihua Ni – Women’s Flyweight 56.7 Kg (125 Lbs)
Tianhao Feng – Men’s Flyweight 56.7 Kg (125 Lbs)
Guangmei Han – Women’s Bantamweight 61.2 Kg (135 Lbs)
Fuyao Li – Men’s Featherweight 65.8 Kg (145 Lbs)
Yunfeng Li – Men’s Featherweight 65.8 Kg (145 Lbs)
Xxx Tanghesi – Men’s Welterweight 77.1 Kg (170 Lbs)

FRANCE
Sola Axel – Men’s Middleweight 83.9 kg (185 lbs)

INDIA
Balakrishna Patange – Men’s Middleweight 83.9 kg (185 lbs)
Vaibhav Shetty – Men’s Middleweight 83.9 kg (185 lbs)

KAZAKHSTAN
Ayan Tursyn – Women’s Atomweight 47.6 kg (105 lbs)
Ukilay Akhmetualikyzy – Women’s Atomweight 47.6 kg (105 lbs)
Yerulan Kabdulov – Men’s Strawweight 52.2 kg (115 lbs)
Bagdat Zhubanysh – Men’s Strawweight 52.2 kg (115 lbs)
Shynar Zhussipova – Women’s Strawweight 52.2 kg (115 lbs)
Nurzhamal Sadykova – Women’s Strawweight 52.2 kg (115 lbs)
Tolkyn Daurenbekova – Women’s Flyweight 56.7 kg (125 lbs)
Darkhan Umirbekov – Men’s Flyweight 56.7 kg (125 lbs)
Adilkhan Ayazbayev – Men’s Flyweight 56.7 kg (125 lbs)
Olzhas Moldagaliyev – Men’s Bantamweight 61.2 kg (135 lbs)
Sora Rakhmonova – Women’s Bantamweight 61.2 kg (135 lbs)
Dastan Amangeldy – Men’s Bantamweight 61.2 kg (135 lbs)
Elaman Shalkimbekov – Men’s Featherweight 65.8 kg (145 lbs)
Antonina Kotlyarevskaya – Women’s Featherweight 65.8 kg (145 lbs)
Anatoliy Zolotykh – Men’s Featherweight 65.8 kg (145 lbs)
Mazhit Sardarov – Men’s Lightweight 70.3 kg (155 lbs)
Neimat Assadov – Men’s Lightweight 70.3 kg (155 lbs)
Talshyn Zhumatayeva – Women’s Lightweight 70.3 kg (155 lbs)
Zhan Kenzhebayev – Men’s Welterweight 77.1 kg (170 lbs)
Aidyn Tolepbayev – Men’s Welterweight 77.1 kg (170 lbs)
Aleksandr Val – Men’s Middleweight 83.9 kg (185 lbs)
Madi Dosmukhametov – Men’s Middleweight 83.9 kg (185 lbs)
Serik Abirov – Men’s Light Heavyweight 93 kg (205 lbs)
Zelemkhan Khumaidov – Men’s Light Heavyweight 93 kg (205 lbs)
Eldar Kudarov – Men’s Heavyweight 120.2 kg (265 lbs)
Alexandr Dya – Men’s Heavyweight 120.2 kg (265 lbs)
Rassul Khatayev – Men’s Super Heavyweight 120.2 kg (265 lbs) +

LEBANON
Onnik Simon Misissian – Men’s Flyweight 56.7 kg (125 lbs)
Joe Aouad – Men’s Lightweight 70.3 kg (155 lbs)
Bachir Ricardo – Men’s Light Heavyweight 93 kg (205 lbs)

MALAYSIA
Amirah Makhtar – Women’s Atomweight 47.6 kg (105 lbs)
Colleen Augustin – Women’s Strawweight 52.2 kg (115 lbs)
Gloria Isabelle Hoong – Women’s Strawweight 52.2 Kg (115 Lbs)
Brandon Tang – Men’s Strawweight 52.2 kg (115 lbs)
Tsan Nieng Khai – Men’s Heavyweight 120.2 kg (265 lbs)

NEW ZEALAND
Talor Wetere – Men’s Welterweight 77.1 kg (170 lbs)

THAILAND
Gayroong Chomchon – Women’s Atomweight 47.6 kg (105 lbs)
Jirayus Chulak – Men’s Flyweight 56.7 kg (125 lbs)
Sirirot Sinchaitan – Men’s Bantamweight 61.2 Kg (135 Lbs)
Viroj Wanram – Men’s Bantamweight 61.2 Kg (135 Lbs)
Narupon Plodpai – Men’s Bantamweight 61.2 Kg (135 Lbs)
Phasit Supharojdilok – Men’s Bantamweight 61.2 Kg (135 Lbs)
Sarun Rosruen – Men’s Featherweight 65.8 Kg (145 Lbs)
Pokpong Malapetch – Men’s Featherweight 65.8 Kg (145 Lbs)
Prach Buapa – Men’s Featherweight 65.8 Kg (145 Lbs)
Alex Blin – Men’s Lightweight 70.3 Kg (155 Lbs)
Chayut Rojanakat – Men’s Lightweight 70.3 Kg (155 Lbs)
Nitchanan Tubsai – Women’s Lightweight 70.3 Kg (155 Lbs)
Thatchai Tariya – Men’s Light Heavyweight 93 Kg (205 Lbs)

UNITED KINGDOM
Muhammad Mokaev – Men’s Flyweight 56.7 kg (125 lbs)

WEIGHT DIVISIONS

WOMEN’S ATOMWEIGHT 47.6 KG (105 LBS)
Amirah Makhtar – Malaysia
Ayan Tursyn – Kazakhstan
Gayroong Chomchon – Thailand
Ukilay Akhmetualikyzy – Kazakhstan

MEN’S STRAWWEIGHT 52.2 KG (115 LBS)
Bagdat Zhubanysh – Kazakhstan
Brandon Tang – Malaysia
Ebrahim Darwish – Bahrain
Isa Aldoy – Bahrain
Yerulan Kabdulov – Kazakhstan

WOMEN’S STRAWWEIGHT 52.2 KG (115 LBS)
Colleen Augustin – Malaysia
Gloria Isabelle Hoong – Malaysia
Nurzhamal Sadykova – Kazakhstan
Shynar Zhussipova – Kazakhstan

MEN’S FLYWEIGHT 56.7 KG (125 LBS)
Adilkhan Ayazbayev – Kazakhstan
Darkhan Umirbekov – Kazakhstan
Jirayus Chulak – Thailand
Mansur Magomedov – Bahrain
Mohammed Almuamari – Bahrain
Muhammad Mokaev – United Kingdom
Onnik Simon Misissian – Lebanon
Tianhao Feng – China

WOMEN’S FLYWEIGHT 56.7 KG (125 LBS)
Huihua Ni – China
Tolkyn Daurenbekova – Kazakhstan

MEN’S BANTAMWEIGHT 61.2 KG (135 LBS)
Ali Yaqoob – Bahrain
Dastan Amangeldy – Kazakhstan
Magomed Idrisov – Bahrain
Narupon Plodpai – Thailand
Olzhas Moldagaliyev – Kazakhstan
Sirirot Sinchaitan – Thailand
Viroj Wanram – Thailand
Phasit Supharojdilok – Thailand

WOMEN’S BANTAMWEIGHT 61.2 KG (135 LBS)
Guangmei Han – China
Sora Rakhmonova – Kazakhstan

MEN’S FEATHERWEIGHT 65.8 KG (145 LBS)
Abdulmanap Magomedov – Bahrain
Anatoliy Zolotykh – Kazakhstan
Elaman Shalkimbekov – Kazakhstan
Fuyao Li – China
Prach Buapa – Thailand
Pokpong Malapetch – Thailand
Sarun Rosruen – Thailand
Yunfeng Li – China

WOMEN’S FEATHERWEIGHT 65.8 KG (145 LBS)
Antonina Kotlyarevskaya – Kazakhstan

MEN’S LIGHTWEIGHT 70.3 KG (155 LBS)
Alex Blin – Thailand
Chayut Rojanakat – Thailand
Joe Aouad – Lebanon
Mazhit Sardarov – Kazakhstan
Neimat Assadov – Kazakhstan
Shamil Gimbatov – Bahrain
Yousif Sayyar – Bahrain

WOMEN’S LIGHTWEIGHT 70.3 KG (155 LBS)
Nitchanan Tubsai – Thailand
Talshyn Zhumatayeva – Kazakhstan

MEN’S WELTERWEIGHT 77.1 KG (170 LBS)
Abbas Khan – Bahrain
Aidyn Tolepbayev – Kazakhstan
Cody Barnwell – Australia
Corey Reeves – Australia
Murad Guseinov – Bahrain
Talor Wetere – New Zealand
Xxx Tanghesi – China
Zhan Kenzhebayev – Kazakhstan

MEN’S MIDDLEWEIGHT 83.9 KG (185 LBS)
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Ukraine MMA Federation Invites Kerrith Brown and Marc Goddard for Assessment of Governing Standards

Photo: National MMA Federation of Ukraine

By IMMAF.org lead writer: Jorden Curran

Director of Regulatory Affairs Marc Goddard joined IMMAF President Kerrith Brown in Kiev, as the nation’s MMA Federation completed its 2019 national amateur championships. Their visit came following invitation from the Ukraine MMA Federation requesting assessment of national commissioning standards in accordance with the latest requirements under IMMAF – WMMAA, the unified international governing body.

“When IMMAF and WMMAA decided to become one organization, we understood that the rules of IMMAF would be used for international events,” Anton Blank explained, Executive Director of the Ukraine MMA Federation.

“In response, we have sent several of our officials to Marc Goddard’s seminar for referees and judges. In turn, they have traveled with seminars across Ukraine for several months to spread and teach these standards. We also have changed from rings to cages and tested the standards of IMMAF within our regional championships and Ukrainian youth championships for under-20’s.

“We decided to invite president Kerrith Brown and one of the most respected referees in the world, Marc Goddard, to examine the changes that we have made and tell us what we are doing wrong and what we are doing right. We hope they enjoyed the time in Kiev and believe their visit will help speed up the development of MMA in Ukraine.”

As the national event played out, key areas of inspection included condition of the cage and its ability to safely contain athletes, on-site medical care, preliminary and post-bout medical protocols, use of an appropriate sports venue, performance of officials, and athlete apparel such as amateur standard gloves, shin guards, and a clear red vs. blue aesthetic to visually signify the amateur level.

“I want to say thank you to the Ukraine Federation who deserve massive credit for what was a forthright gesture, to not remain insular and open their doors to invite critique of their processes,” Marc Goddard (pictured above) commented. “This cannot be overstated and I expect further member nations of IMMAF – WMMAA to do the same.

“The hospitality in Ukraine was second to none, and I’m very encouraged by the standards under the federation. When I step into a venue, I know what I should expect to see. All nations will of course have unique aspects or quirks, but general standardization is what we are looking for on a global scale.

“First and foremost, my eye is focused on safety; I am meticulous for medical standards and protocols. The performance of officials and anything that constitutes the health and well-being of athletes must be scrutinized. By in large, the standards I viewed were good.

“Standardization is key, from rules and regulations to the aesthetics of recognizable amateur competition. It is better for everyone to be singing from the same hymn sheet, and these visits will provide opportunity for shared knowledge from both ends.”   

The IMMAF president (pictured above) concluded that, through their activities, Ukraine are leading by example for a synchronized understanding across the world of Amateur MMA that will spearhead the sport’s Olympic movement through mutual understanding.

“This has been an example of how we can support worldwide members,” Kerrith Brown stated. “There is a mandate for correct infrastructure, be it cage safety, medical standards, amateur apparel and appropriate venues for amateurs, the list goes on. Many countries will have different interpretations of how to meet proper requirements, and with someone of Marc’s level we can identify and aid federations in operating to a high standard.  

“IMMAF – WMMAA is unified with integration of the Board of Directors set to be complete for the start of 2020. It is a gradual transition and nations such as Ukraine are leading the way for a recognizable global standard, and that lead should be followed.“We are thankful for the support shown by the Ukraine Federation. With this kind of synchronization the Olympic dream is not far away.”